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New Year, New Me: Job Interview Tips for the New Year

Whether it's a one-on-one interview, a group interview, or the dreaded panel interview, these meetings can be nerve-wracking if not properly prepared. Start by reviewing this foolproof list before and after your next job interview to see if there's anything you need to improve.

With unemployment rates at the lowest levels in a dozen years, it’s a great time to look for a new job or a better job. CareerSource Palm Beach County can help you stand out at your job interview. Whether it’s a one-on-one interview, a group interview, or the dreaded panel interview, these meetings can be nerve-wracking if not properly prepared.

Start by reviewing this foolproof list before and after your next job interview to see if there’s anything you need to improve:

Before the Interview

  • Research: Learn everything you can about the organization and become familiar with what they do, what they care about and where they might be headed.
  • Social Media: Review all of your social media and delete anything that may be judged as unprofessional – such as pictures of you with a drink in your hand, angry posts, or videos of childish behavior.
  • Familiarity: Familiarize yourself with the most common interview questions and answers, your past employment history (you don’t want to contradict yourself!), and the job description of the position you applied for.
  • Resumes: Review your resume and edit it so that there are no typos or grammatical errors. Make plenty of copies!
  • Interview Toolkit: Every job seeker should carry at all times: a notepad, a nice pen, at least ten printed resumes, and your driver’s license.
  • Professional Attire: Prepare to dress for success in professionally appropriate attire. Even if the job you applied for is a “laid-back” profession that doesn’t require business attire, dress professionally to show that you are serious about getting the job.

During the Interview

  • Body Language: Don’t slouch, sit straight. Make sure not to cross your arms or legs in a stand-off manner. Smile and make eye contact with the interviewer. Body language is a form of communication. If you appear disinterested, unfriendly or untrustworthy, you’re less likely to get the job.
  • Your Voice: Control the tone and volume of your voice. When speaking with a potential employer, keep your tone in the mid-level range. You’re less likely to get hired if you’re too loud or too soft-spoken.
  • Responses: Respond to each question appropriately and avoid story telling. If you familiarized yourself with common interview questions ahead of time and had prepared answers, you’ll be more likely to get the job.

After the Interview

  • Follow Up: Did you follow up after the interview with a kind email or letter thanking them for giving you the opportunity to interview for the role? No matter what, always send a thank you note after your interview. Be brief and include a couple sentences about what you liked about the organization, any other questions you may have for the hiring manager and remember to ask politely when you can expect to hear back from them about their decision. It cannot hurt to ask! If you do not hear back from the employer, follow up with another email 7-10 days later.